Elly Hoyt

2 Shows

Elly Hoyt is a truly gifted jazz vocalist who has an intoxicating love for music and life – even saying, “music means so much that it slightly rules my existence”. The Tasmanian-born, 29-year-old has just released her second album Oranges & Sunshine, which shows-off her smooth, seductive and versatile voice.

From the time she stood on stage as a five-year-old and overwhelmed parents and staff with a solo rendition of Silent Night, Elly Hoyt has been on stage wowing audiences ever since. Born to be a soloist, it was clear at a young age that Elly’s sultry tones and natural ability to learn quickly would take her to the world stage in no time. By 14, she was singing the national anthem at the Australia v New Zealand cricket match, making her the youngest vocalist in Australian history to sing before the cricket board. Returning the following year for the Australian v England match, the slender teen continued to amaze audiences with her impressive voice.

In 2006, Elly moved to Brisbane to attain a Bachelor of Music, majoring in jazz voice, at the Queensland Conservatorium. A year later, Elly was making waves when she became a finalist in the ABC 612 Jazz Singers competition, judged by Vince Jones. Winning the renowned Generation in Jazz vocal scholarship, judged by James Morrison in 2008, projected Elly into the Australian jazz scene where she has sung alongside a long list of top Australian and international jazz musicians and vocalists.
In late 2010, Elly launched her debut self-titled album and won an Australian Jazz Bell Award in 2011 in the category of Best Australian Jazz Vocal Album. Shortly after winning the Bell award in 2011, Elly was accepted into Stanford Workshop where she studied song writing before moving to Boston to study a Masters of Jazz Voice at the New England Conservatory. Hoyt is an active educator and recently completed a Masters of Vocal Pedagogy from the Queensland Conservatorium, Griffith University (QCGU). She currently lectures in Jazz Voice at QCGU and the Jazz Music Institute (JMI), Brisbane.

“Elly Hoyt takes no prisoners. Her voice, her singing, her phrasing, her presence – everything about her is so commanding and captivating, that one should feel sorry for the unsuspecting listener, who presses ‘play’, unable to imagine the emotional roller coaster about to unfold,” Nikos Fotakis wrote in Jazz Australia.

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